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TCLF in the News

October 24, 2014
Disconnected Landscapes

The Cultural Landscape Foundation® (TCLF) announces Landslide® 2014: Art and the Landscape – with eleven examples of land-based art from ancient petroglyphs to earthworks, folk art creations, single artist, multi-acre installations and others threatened with demolition, neglect, poor maintenance, vandalism and lack of funding.

October 23, 2014
Curbed LA

Preservation organization is worried about the Watts Towers.

October 23, 2014
Michigan Radio

A new report lists public art in Detroit and Toledo among the most endangered in the United States.

October 23, 2014
ArtNet

The annual Landslide, the Cultural Landscape Foundation's list of threatened or at-risk land-based art sites, was announced yesterday. 

October 23, 2014
The Charlotte Observer

Large folk art creations in urban Detroit and Los Angeles neighborhoods, a museum garden in New York and a massive light installation on the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge are being listed among the nation's endangered landscapes this year.

October 23, 2014
Art+Seek

It’s called the Landslide list. It’s compiled by the Cultural Landscape Foundation, which is committed to preserving landscape art and public art — and educating people about them.

October 23, 2014
Daily Freeman News

The Opus 40 installation in Saugerties is being listed among the nation’s endangered landscapes this year.

October 23, 2014
4Culture

Robert Morris’ 1979 land reclamation artwork, Johnson Pit #30 has been recognized by The Cultural Landscape Foundation (TCLF) through their Landslide 2014: Art and Landscape program as one of eleven notable land-based artworks worthy of attention, restoration or rescuing.

October 22, 2014
The Dirt

Recently restored to much ado through a six-year process, Mellon Square in Pittsburgh was the first Modernist space in the nation built over a subterranean parking garage.

October 22, 2014
SF Gate

Those programmed lights on the Bay Bridge will come down early next year, but they then could return once and for all — if, and only if, the creators of the shimmering installation can raise $4million by Dec. 31.