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Franklin Park

Historic Name: West Roxbury Park
Boston, MA

The largest park in the Emerald Necklace, measuring 527 acres, it was meant to serve as Boston’s “central” park. Frederick Law Olmsted, Sr., with John C. Olmsted, completed the general plan in 1885. In 1905, John considered the park “an illustration of park designing, the plan and report on Franklin Park is probably the best piece of work done by its designer, Frederick Law Olmsted.”

Subdivided into two great sections separated by the depressed cross-park road, Glen Lane, the Country Park portion represents 2/3 of the acreage, with the remainder, known as the Ante Park, set aside for active recreation. From 1885-1896, John supervised construction, creating a park with a rich variety of landscapes reminiscent of the New England countryside. The design took advantage of existing topography, ledges, and vegetation to strengthen the intended Picturesque character. Although individual passages of scenery, from woodlands to meadows, were often larger than in other Emerald Necklace parks, contributing elements such as the drives, entrances, bridges, walls, steps, overlooks, and site furniture were of a similar palette. As intended from the outset, a golf course replaced the former Country Park Meadow in 1896. It was the first course in the city and the second public course in America. A greater departure from Olmsted’s intent was the Franklin Park Zoo designed by Arthur Shurcliff in 1910. Shurcliff also redesigned the drives at Peabody Circle in 1925.
 

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